Typography in Liverpool

A recent post by Creative Bloq got me thinking. It was about the 2017 logo design trend of ‘uppercasification’ (their word not mine). What they mean by this word is the trend for companies and brands to put their text into uppercase capitals. You can read the original post here.

I think the reason this post attracted me is because typography was already on my mind. It feels like there is currently one particular font that is everywhere. It is a flowing, elegant, script style, reminiscent of brush calligraphy. Yes, it can look lovely. However, it is not always easily read – a point that was brought home to me when I was sent somebody’s email address written in this font! And, possibly more importantly in my opinion, it has become overused – it has lost its impact. Maybe the trend for ‘uppercasification’ is a reaction against this ubiquitous and very decorative style of font that we are seeing so much of. In the words of The Beautiful South‘s song Rotterdam (or Anywhere) 

“And everyone is blonde

And everyone is beautiful

When blondes and beautiful are multiple

They become so dull and dutiful”

Recently I visited Liverpool for a long weekend. While there, I photographed a variety of typography and fonts, from the hand-drawn to machine produced. In many cases the choice of font used carried as much message as the words. And I think that this is how is should be. A beautiful font is only beautiful when used well and appropriately, and when any font becomes overused it loses its beauty and impact. I hope you enjoy some of my photos from that visit. Maybe you will be inspired to look at the typography used in your own local area.

 

You can’t visit Liverpool without being made aware of its musical heritage, and in particular The Beatles and the Merseybeat scene:

 

There are many other references to Liverpool’s history and heritage, especially its importance as a great port. However, there is also modern rebuilding and renovation:

 

And finally, restaurants and cafes are a vital part of any big city. And a great source for typography, especially hand lettering on menu boards:

 

I’m sure that any city or town would reveal a wide range of fonts and typography styles. And we should relish that variety.

 

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